Casey Kaplan

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Art Fairs,Artist News

Sarah Crowner, Wave, Red Legs, 2016, Acrylic on canvas, sewn, 30 x 24", 60 x 48". Photo: Jean Vong

Solo Presentation of Sarah Crowner at The Art Show at The Park Avenue Armory

CASEY KAPLAN STAND D28
MARCH 1 – MARCH 5
ART DEALERS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA
PARK AVENUE AND 67TH STREET, NEW YORK

Art Fairs,Artist News,Gallery News

Matthew Brannon, War Correspondent, Saigon 1967, 2016, Photo: Pierre Le Hors

CASEY KAPLAN AT ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH

STAND J4

DECEMBER 1 – 4
PREVIEW: NOVEMBER 30

EXHIBITING ARTISTS:
KEVIN BEASLEY, MATTHEW BRANNON, SARAH CROWNER, N. DASH, TRISHA DONNELLY, HARIS EPAMINONDA, JONATHAN GARDNER, LIAM GILLICK, GIORGIO GRIFFA, BRIAN JUNGEN, MATEO LÓPEZ, DIEGO PERRONE, HUGH SCOTT-DOUGLAS, SIMON STARLING AND GARTH WEISER

Art Fairs,Gallery News

Casey Kaplan at Frieze London 2016

PREVIEW: OCTOBER 5
OCTOBER 6 – 9

EXHIBITING ARTISTS: 
KEVIN BEASLEY, MATTHEW BRANNON, SARAH CROWNER, N. DASH, GIORGIO GRIFFA, BRIAN JUNGEN, HUGH SCOTT-DOUGLAS, DAVID THORPE AND GARTH WEISER 

LONDON NW1 4NR

Art Fairs,Gallery News

N. Dash, Untitled, 2015, Adobe, oil, graphite, pigment, acrylic, linen, canvas, jute, wood support, 81.5 x 24" / 207 x 70cm, Photo: Jean Vong


Casey Kaplan at Frieze New York 2015

Frieze New York 2015

May 14 – 17, 2015

Randall’s Island Park, New York

 

Casey Kaplan Gallery is pleased to announce its participation at Frieze New York with a presentation that brings together a grouping of artists, diverse in media and process, whose work reflects ever-present themes of materiality and identity that permeate throughout the gallery’s program.

Perspectives vary and contrast, but an engagement with material and an emphasis on process persists, as seen in the work of Kevin Beasley, N. Dash, Sarah Crowner, Giorgio Griffa and Garth Weiser. Beasley continues to observe the fundamentals of materiality in Untitled (2015), which consists of a blend of personal apparel, fragments from the studio, polyurethane foam and resin. It allows for a palpable experience that is bound by the maker’s material history. This inherent physicality is further explored by N. Dash, whose use of unprocessed materials including wood, linen, and adobe, allows for a product that is comparable to a lived experience, communicated through the meeting of disparate structural or corporeal elements. Sarah Crowner’s patterns that are first drawn, painted, then cut, sewn and finally stretched, as seen in Rotated Lips, allow the process or making of an object to be intimately connected to the composition and in effect, the viewer. Giorgio Griffa considers materiality paramount in his acrylic on un-stretched canvas and linen works, emphasizing the act of painting through gesture, color, and texture. From the late 1960s to today, Griffa has maintained a language of sorts through simple, distinct movements that reveal the densities of material – the acrylic seeps into the fabric and the single brushstroke is memorialized. Garth Weiser’s layered paintings are a paradigm for the consideration of material, texture, and the procedural margin between careful preparation and that which gives way to chance.

As notions of materiality and tactility linger, identity and origin are considered by artists Matthew Brannon, Nathan Carter, Liam Gillick, Mateo López, Marlo Pascual, Julia Schmidt and David Thorpe. Matthew Brannon’s silkscreen and acrylic work on paper maintains the artist’s resounding themes of the autobiographical narrative and the destabilization of language. Liam Gillick, known for his examinations of social interaction and cultural or political systems, remains in tune stylistically with his discernable oeuvre, for the powder coated aluminum works presented here question the role of art within these systems that make up society, and in effect our place in it. Nathan Carter’s visual interpretations of frenzied communication systems, networks of transportation, and the unruly intersections and tensions that are central to our everyday, toy with the notion of a societal breakdown and the impending consequences for the individual.

Expanding upon a concern towards mark making and the power of the symbol, Mateo López presents a playful approach to the discourse between opposing facets such as the realistic representation of one’s surroundings versus the impending inferences that result, as seen in Brazo (arm) (2014). A collapse in the connection between subject and viewer occurs in Marlo Pascual’s Untitled (2015), consisting of two digital c-prints mounted on Plexiglas, by fracturing the image. In effect, Pascual is able to disorient and cause an introspective encounter as the viewer is left with the original, broken image, regardless of any attempts to view from different angles. Julia Schmidt sifts through the Internet and print media in search of commonplace source imagery that might suggest anonymity, subsequently cropping the image and repurposing it by re-painting it. Schmidt’s reinterpretation of mass production allows for the viewer to zero in on a single image, the artist’s hand clearly present, to find a human connection and in effect, a return to the individual experience. David Thorpe executes his frescoes with pre-modernist methods, resulting in an almost scientific approach to representations of nature in composition and illustration. A reverence for the individual is suggested, articulated by the handmade quality of each work.

Art Fairs,Gallery News

Mateo López, Cajitas Des Colores, 2014, Cutout paper

Casey Kaplan at Art Basel Miami Beach

Casey Kaplan at Art Basel Miami Beach
Art Galleries
Booth J04
December 4 – 7

Works by:
Kevin Beasley, Matthew Brannon, Nathan Carter, Sarah Crowner, Geoffrey Farmer, Liam Gillick, Giorgio Griffa, Mateo López, Jonathan Monk, Marlo Pascual, Diego Perrone, Julia Schmidt, Simon Starling, Gabriel Vormstein, Garth Weiser

Art Fairs

Sanya Kantarovsky, Lumpenproletariat #2, 2013, Oil and watercolor on canvas

Casey Kaplan at Art Basel Miami Beach

December 5 – 8
Hall B Stand J04

Works by:
Matthew Brannon, Jeff Burton, Nathan Carter, Jason Dodge, Geoffrey Farmer, Liam Gillick, Giorgio Griffa, Brian Jungen, Sanya Kantarovsky, Jonathan Monk, Marlo Pascual, Julia Schmidt, Simon Starling, David Thorpe, Gabriel Vormstein, Garth Weiser

Art Fairs

GIORGIO GRIFFA. Verticale Verde, 1976, Acrylic on Canvas

Casey Kaplan at Frieze London, Oct 17 – 20

Stand A3

Giorgio Griffa, Marlo Pascual, Garth Weiser

Casey Kaplan is pleased to announce its participation in Frieze London, with a presentation of historical works by Giorgio Griffa, as well as new works by Marlo Pascual and Garth Weiser.

Dating from 1968 – 1980, works by Giorgio Griffa employ a vocabulary of marks that includes horizontal lines, sponges, fingerprints and dashes. Adhering to a belief that painting is an action that is “constant and never finished,” these soft-spoken compositions also contain a decisive end point, as if they were to stop mid-sentence. The completion of a work functions more as a suspension of the relationship between painting and painter bound within the finite frame of the canvas. After the acrylic has dried, each painting is carefully and neatly folded into uniform sections and filed as a register of their collective life as a whole. Giorgio Griffa’s Segni orizzontali, 1975, is currently on view in the permanent collection of Tate Modern as part of “Energy and Process: Beyond Painting”. The work was purchased with funds provided by the Tate Americas Foundation, Courtesy Shabin and Nadir Mohamed 2013.

Following an exhibition at Moore College in Philadelphia, Marlo Pascual has turned to the repeated use of a singular image. A headshot of a woman whose gaze extends beyond the picture plane is reproduced and layered with disparate images, creating works that point towards our shifting understanding of the role images play in our desire for narrative. The images work in tandem to provide an imagined psychology of the woman – occupying a space between the viewer’s projection and an abstraction of the space of the image. This is furthered as images from the double exposures are extracted as physical objects, only to once again be reflected back on the image.

Garth Weiser’s new paintings result equally from chance as they do from a conscious manipulation of materials. Their surfaces resemble interference patterns and the marks of digital distortion with a quickness that belies the works’ slow systematic building. They are interrupted by scars and lacerations, which appear to be at once erupting from the under painting and attacked on their surface. Pigments and sprays are applied, collapsing the painting’s layers into a singular plane that bears the accumulated artifacts of translation and degradation.

Art Fairs

LIAM GILLICK, Ingrained Production, 2012, Powder coated aluminium, Installed dimensions: 70.9” (H) x 67.5” (W) x 3.9” (D) / 180cm (H) x 171.5 (W) x 10cm (D)

Casey Kaplan at Art 44 Basel, June 13 – 16

Art Galleries
Hall 2.1 Stand N16

Works by:
Henning Bohl, Matthew Brannon, Jeff Burton, Nathan Carter, Jason Dodge, Trisha Donnelly, Geoffrey Farmer, Liam Gillick, Giorgio Griffa, Brian Jungen, Jonathan Monk, Marlo Pascual, Diego Perrone, Pietro Roccasalva, Julia Schmidt, Simon Starling, David Thorpe, Gabriel Vormstein, Garth Weiser, Johannes Wohnseifer

Art Fairs

Casey Kaplan at Frieze New York

Frieze New York
May 10 – 13
Stand A7

 

New works by Julia Schmidt

For her presentation at Frieze New York, Julia Schmidt’s (b. 1976, Wolfen, Germany) subjects range from a scratch in the industrial gloss of a high-end automobile to bottles of hand sanitizer – vestiges of our present that are each abstracted, repurposed and distilled into new networks of meaning. Producing paintings in cycles rather than in series, Schmidt culls images from Internet searches, cell phone photography, and everyday print media before they are cropped, filtered, and mediated through a myriad of brushstrokes. This body of work marks a new exploration of color, favoring an artificial palette that in itself becomes a referent, whether to the newsprint of the international edition of The Financial Times or cheaply produced colored copyshop paper. These lurid washes, which at times seem as equally luminous as they are poisonous, work not only to deconstruct her source images, but to rebuild them with new contents. Moving with ease between abstraction and representation, the work displays a honed process of selection and insistent filtering that handles images as artifacts – cultural objects to be examined in all their layers. Through this process, vernacular images become dialectics that aim to expose the complex systems underlying the day-to-day, economies of exchange, and the cyclic nature of valuation and devaluation.

Recent solo presentations of Julia Schmidt’s work include: A Painting Cycle, Nomas Foundation, Rome (2012), STOK ROOM, Galerie für Zeitgenössische Kunst, Leipzig (2009) andTourism and Painting, Museum der Bildenden Künste, Leipzig (2007). Her work has also been included in numerous group exhibitions such as Made in Germany Zwei, Kestnergesellschaft, Hannover (2012), Villa Massimo, Martin Gropius Bau, Berlin (2012), CONTROL, Magazine 4 Bregenzer Kunstverein, Bregenz (2011) and Freisteller: Villa Romana-Fellows 2008, Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin.

Additionally, the gallery will present a work by Trisha Donnelly (b. 1974, San Francisco).

 

Art Fairs

MATTHEW BRANNON. Unlearn, 2012. Wood, enamel, acrylic, high-density hand carved foam, silkscreen on paper.

CASEY KAPLAN AT ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH, DECEMBER 6-9

CASEY KAPLAN IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE ITS PARTICIPATION IN ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH.

DECEMBER 6-9, 2012
ART GALLERIES
HALL B / STAND J04

 

WORKS BY:
MATTHEW BRANNON, JEFF BURTON, NATHAN CARTER, JASON DODGE, TRISHA DONNELLY, GEOFFREY FARMER, LIAM GILLICK, GIORGIO GRIFFA, BRIAN JUNGEN, JONATHAN MONK, MARLO PASCUAL, DIEGO PERRONE, PIETRO ROCCASALVA, JULIA SCHMIDT, SIMON STARLING, DAVID THORPE, GABRIEL VORMSTEIN, GARTH WEISER

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